‘Let’s bee friends’, a project for a research in urban bees in London, 2013, Bartlett Summer Foundation, Building Project Workshop (Three weeks). 

Students:
Structures: Adrienne Young and Cynthia Tian
Inhabitable Space and Modular Construction: Duncan Lomax and Ivy Yuchen Cao
Plant Habitat: Rumpa Paweenpongpat, Jessica Apps and Simon Glemser. ‘Let’s bee friends’, a project for a research in urban bees in London, 2013, Bartlett Summer Foundation, Building Project Workshop (Three weeks). 

Students:
Structures: Adrienne Young and Cynthia Tian
Inhabitable Space and Modular Construction: Duncan Lomax and Ivy Yuchen Cao
Plant Habitat: Rumpa Paweenpongpat, Jessica Apps and Simon Glemser. ‘Let’s bee friends’, a project for a research in urban bees in London, 2013, Bartlett Summer Foundation, Building Project Workshop (Three weeks). 

Students:
Structures: Adrienne Young and Cynthia Tian
Inhabitable Space and Modular Construction: Duncan Lomax and Ivy Yuchen Cao
Plant Habitat: Rumpa Paweenpongpat, Jessica Apps and Simon Glemser.
‘Let’s bee friends’, a project for a research in urban bees in London, 2013, Bartlett Summer Foundation, Building Project Workshop (Three weeks). 

Students:
Structures: Adrienne Young and Cynthia Tian
Inhabitable Space and Modular Construction: Duncan Lomax and Ivy Yuchen Cao
Plant Habitat: Rumpa Paweenpongpat, Jessica Apps and Simon Glemser. ‘Let’s bee friends’, a project for a research in urban bees in London, 2013, Bartlett Summer Foundation, Building Project Workshop (Three weeks). 

Students:
Structures: Adrienne Young and Cynthia Tian
Inhabitable Space and Modular Construction: Duncan Lomax and Ivy Yuchen Cao
Plant Habitat: Rumpa Paweenpongpat, Jessica Apps and Simon Glemser. ‘Let’s bee friends’, a project for a research in urban bees in London, 2013, Bartlett Summer Foundation, Building Project Workshop (Three weeks). 

Students:
Structures: Adrienne Young and Cynthia Tian
Inhabitable Space and Modular Construction: Duncan Lomax and Ivy Yuchen Cao
Plant Habitat: Rumpa Paweenpongpat, Jessica Apps and Simon Glemser. ‘Let’s bee friends’, a project for a research in urban bees in London, 2013, Bartlett Summer Foundation, Building Project Workshop (Three weeks). 

Students:
Structures: Adrienne Young and Cynthia Tian
Inhabitable Space and Modular Construction: Duncan Lomax and Ivy Yuchen Cao
Plant Habitat: Rumpa Paweenpongpat, Jessica Apps and Simon Glemser. ‘Let’s bee friends’, a project for a research in urban bees in London, 2013, Bartlett Summer Foundation, Building Project Workshop (Three weeks). 

Students:
Structures: Adrienne Young and Cynthia Tian
Inhabitable Space and Modular Construction: Duncan Lomax and Ivy Yuchen Cao
Plant Habitat: Rumpa Paweenpongpat, Jessica Apps and Simon Glemser. ‘Let’s bee friends’, a project for a research in urban bees in London, 2013, Bartlett Summer Foundation, Building Project Workshop (Three weeks). 

Students:
Structures: Adrienne Young and Cynthia Tian
Inhabitable Space and Modular Construction: Duncan Lomax and Ivy Yuchen Cao
Plant Habitat: Rumpa Paweenpongpat, Jessica Apps and Simon Glemser. ‘Let’s bee friends’, a project for a research in urban bees in London, 2013, Bartlett Summer Foundation, Building Project Workshop (Three weeks). 

Students:
Structures: Adrienne Young and Cynthia Tian
Inhabitable Space and Modular Construction: Duncan Lomax and Ivy Yuchen Cao
Plant Habitat: Rumpa Paweenpongpat, Jessica Apps and Simon Glemser.

final project. 1:10 model as a testing protype.  
‘Let’s bee friends’, a project for a research in urban bees in London, 2013, Bartlett Summer Foundation, Building Project Workshop (Three weeks). Students: Structures: Adrienne Young and Cynthia Tian Inhabitable Space and Modular Construction: Duncan Lomax and Ivy Yuchen Cao Plant Habitat: Rumpa Paweenpongpat, Jessica Apps and Simon Glemser.

Here it is the article published in the number 7 of the outstanding Colombian magazine ARCHIPILLS (Pildoras de Arquitectura). Thank you very much to Miguel Mesa who invited my to participate for the second time.

Spanish text: http://archipills.com/carlosjimenesvol7.html
English text: http://archipills.com/carlosjimenesvol7i.html

Mystery

To paraphrase the renowned Spanish lawyer Maria Fernanda Silva “Mysteries, what we can actually call mysteries, are only a few things. What there is, is called Natural Science”.
While it is true that science could explain 100% of what happens in the world, it is also true that most of the facts of reality are surrounded by a certain aura of mystery. Focusing our attention to the world of design, what turns out more cryptic are the processes for the mind developed in an unconscious or premeditated way in order to get an innovative, unique and surprising result. In other words, what is really interesting and mysterious at the same time is to understand the principles that determine whether a result is creative, or just an iteration of something already existing. These factors have been defined and studies by Todd Lubart*, professor of psychology at the Université Paris Descartes, whose essays unravel the key points of the intellectual process necessary to develop innovations in any field of theoretical creation.
The field of architecture, by establishing bridges between the theoretical and ohysical world, does not find a complete answer in Todd Lubart’s studies. Therefore, our task here is to present the nine fundamental mysteries of creativity, which a designer faces in each project:

1- Everything starts at the precise moment in which we receive a mysterious commission or just a small niche in our environment that we find convenient to complete, improve and/or correct is discovered. The ability of observation of reality constitutes an accurate and inexhaustible source of design opportunities. However, the success, from the point of view of creativity, lies not so much in the identification of the problem but in the representational structure of the issue to be solved.

2- The second is the mysterious cocktail of previous knowledge. All the information stored in the brain, whether acquired through formal processes (studies, investigation, etc.) or informal ones (everyday experience, or other means) is combined consciously and unconsciously producing multiple results. The greater the knowledge of the group and individual, more original options are obtained.

3- The mystery of innovation. In a world where innovation is crucial for the survival of the designer. It is important to note that it does not depend on innate qualities but, largely, on the thought styles we use such as: letting oneself be guided by intuition, making small adjustments on something already existing, restructuring a problem from different approaches, contrasting global and partial aspects of the context where the problem belongs…among others.

4 The mysterious decision…, which is always risky. Not all the design options are equally innovative, useful and/or convenient. Just a small part of the alternatives will be executed and tested. Thus, we can certify that a creative solution implies risk. The designer’s personality is key in this aspect, for perseverance, tolerance to failure and even self-esteem (among other qualities); allow unusual ways of design to be taken, giving place to visionary solutions.

5- The mysterious inner strength that does not let you quit. The motivation (or ‘vital fluid’ as defined by the band Astrud) is the key for achieving the designer’s purposes. It is not an easy road but a difficult exploration.

6 The mystery of the creative environment. Both in the field of art (The Factory, Black Mountain College) and in architecture and design (Bauhaus, Zuloark and their barley field) the environment in which creation happens unequivocally influences the result obtained. The physical conditions of space, the access to a specific technology, the possibility for individual development, cultural diversity, the critical mass re4ached and collaborations formed, or even the lack of them, increase the chances to find innovative answers to problems detected.

7 The mysterious power of action. During the fabrication of samples and prototypes, a relation slightly different to the established by the community of creators in previous phases of design is determined. Reality is in charge of making fortuitous combinations, new contributions and even mistakes that will define previously unexpected iterations. The action is in itself the equivalent to what could be a ‘radical’ style of thought.

8- The penultimate is the mysterious result, which is born with the intention to improve the user’s life or the context (on a certain measure). This result is always a surprise, impossible to predict from the beginning of the design process. I will illustrate this with an image of the final project developed in the Bartlett Summer Foundation on 2013** , in which students*** from different cultures and professions (without previous architectural knowledge), decide to enroll during three weeks to discover what is the world of contemporary architectural creation.

9- The last mystery, the most important one, is the mysterious use that the final user of the invention will give this new piece. Without a doubt a creative act in itself.

* Confluence Approach Toward Creativity, Tood I. Lubbart (1994).

** Tutors:
- Week 1: Casaleganitos (Beatriz Sendín, Leticia López de Santiago, Marwan Zouein & piss2mil) + Emilio García Navarro.
- Week 2: Nacho Bautista, Tom Svilans, Megan Smedy + piss2mil.
- Week 3: Tom Svilans, Megan Smedy + piss2mil.

*** Students:
Structures: Adrienne Young and Cynthia Tian
Inhabitable Space and Modular Construction: Duncan Lomax and Ivy Yuchen Cao
Plant Habitat: Rumpa Paweenpongpat, Jessica Apps and Simon Glemser.

Carlos Jiménez Cenamor (Casaleganitos)

January 2014